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For the Paramount Comedy and Channel 4 series, see Armstrong and Miller (TV series).
The Armstrong and Miller Show
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Series title card

Format Sketch comedy
Starring Alexander Armstrong
Ben Miller
Country of origin United Kingdom
Language(s) English
No. of series 3
No. of episodes 19
Production
Running time 30 minutes
Production company(s) Hat Trick Productions
Broadcast
Original channel BBC One
Original run 26 October 2007 (2007-10-26) – present
Chronology
Preceded by Armstrong and Miller
External links
Official website

The Armstrong and Miller Show is a British sketch comedy television show produced by Hat Trick Productions for BBC One. It features the double act Armstrong and Miller and a number of notable scriptwriters including Andy Hamilton and The League of Gentlemen‘s Jeremy Dyson.

The series followed four series of Armstrong and Miller on the Paramount Comedy Channel and Channel 4 between 1997 and 2001.

Contents

[edit] Some recurring characters and jokes

  • Two World War II airmen who speak in posh, or cut-glass, Home counties accents but have the language and attitudes of chav stereotypes, using colloquial terms such as “blad” and arbitrarily saying terms such as “like” and “and shit”.
  • Brabbins and Fyffe, a pair of Flanders and Swann-like musicians who sing bawdy songs, sometimes hastily censored by the BBC.
  • An insensitive but caring father (played by Armstrong) with the inability to sugar-coat difficult issues for his son (played by Tyger Drew-Honey).
  • Roger (played by Miller) who continually returns home early, oblivious to clues that his wife and best friend are having an affair. He accepts the increasingly ludicrous explanations.
  • Two Neanderthals who negotiate their way anachronistically through modern social difficulties such as job interviews and baby naming.
  • Vox pops in which characters describe their quirks and mental illnesses and end with “so that’s why I became a teacher”.
  • A racist satellite navigation system that advises a driver to avoid certain roads for tabloid-inspired reasons.
  • Dennis Lincoln-Park, a TV historian (played by Miller) who accidentally destroys priceless historical treasures.
  • A man who accidentally reveals too much information about his strange and disturbing hobbies while in polite company.
  • A dentist who recounts sordid tales of tasteless encounters to which his patient, whose mouth is full of dental equipment, is unable to object.
  • Parodies of public information films, voiced by Armstrong.
  • Various characters (played by Armstrong) including a children’s TV presenter with two puppet sidekicks and a marriage counsellor, who after other characters have left the room utters the words “Kill them” into an intercom.
  • Jim (played by Miller), on honeymoon in Hawaii alone after his wife left him for the DJ on their wedding day.
  • A businessman (played by Armstrong), who is pursued by a team of researchers providing him with apparently useless and random information. He is fired in the final episode of series 2.
  • A guy who regularly wanders into a shop to browse, only to be told by the salesman on hand to “fuck off” if he’s not buying anything.
  • An MI6 agent is trying to do serious work, but his over-caring boss makes light of these situations and forces the agent to partake in fun, children’s activities.
  • Various suave male characters whose intentions are dashed when the other characters in the sketch notice their hairstyle, with the words “Ugh. Ponytail!”, and start vomiting.
  • Miranda (played by Armstrong) and Pru (played by Miller) who run the Dandylions vegetarian restaurant, politely trying not to argue in front of the customers, until a customer’s comment highlights their difficulties. A brawl is instigated by the proprietors with the words “Pru, it’s kicking off!”
  • A selection of Regency-era suitors and spinsters whose mid-dance conversational advances are unexpectedly explicit.
  • The British Prime Minister (played by Miller), who invariably leaves something vitally important behind after a successful meeting, but is too embarrassed to return and collect it.
  • Doctor Tia (played by Armstrong), who “lives in Botswana, saving lives. Do you?”. He addresses the camera about his insights into local culture, and the fruits of his work, only for the camera to reveal that he is secretly despised by the people he is trying to help.
  • Various characters experiencing extraordinary success, only to reveal to the camera: “I’m wearing my wife’s knickers.”
  • Three children’s TV presenters who are publicly humiliated for their inappropriate behaviour, and have to apologise and explain their actions to their audience in child-friendly language.
  • A parody of Jeeves and Wooster, with Mr Stafford (played by Armstrong) and his butler Veal (played by Miller). Stafford is a bigot who acts with criminal disregard for others, and then asks for Veal’s help sorting out the mess. Veal is horrified.

[edit] Chronology

Series Episodes First aired
1 7 26 October – 14 December 2007
2 6 16 October – 27 November 2009
3 6 2010

[edit] Awards

Visitors to British Comedy Guide voted The Armstrong and Miller Show the “Best Sketch Show of 2007”.[1]

“The Armstrong and Miller Show” was nominated for and won the 2010 Bafta award for the Best Comedy Programme.[2]

[edit] Live show

2010 will see a UK tour of The Armstrong and Miller Show, featuring new sketches and favourite characters. Details of tour dates can be found at http://www.mickperrin.com

[edit] References

  1. ^ “The Comedy.co.uk Awards 2007”. British Comedy Guide. 2008-01-21. http://www.comedy.co.uk/awards/2007/. Retrieved 2009-01-19. 
  2. ^ “2010 BAFTA Awards: round-up”. The Spy Report (Media Spy). 7 June 2010. http://www.mediaspy.org/report/2010/06/07/2010-bafta-awards-round-up/. Retrieved 7 June 2010. 

[edit] DVD releases

The 1st and the 2nd series have been released on Region 2.

[edit] External links

Sketch comedy shows

Absolutely · Alas Smith and Jones · Alistair McGowan’s Big Impression · All That · The Amanda Show · The Andy Dick Show · Après Match · The Armstrong and Miller Show · At Last the 1948 Show · The Ben Stiller Show · The Benny Hill Show · Big Train · Bigipedia · A Bit of Fry and Laurie · Bizarre · Blue Collar TV · Bo’ Selecta! · Bull Island  · Burnistoun  · The Carol Burnett Show · The Catherine Tate Show · Caesar’s Hour · Cedric the Entertainer Presents · Chappelle’s Show · The Cher Show · Chewin’ the Fat · CODCO · The Comedy Company · Comedy Inc. · Dead Ringers · Derrick Comedy · The Dana Carvey Show · Do Not Adjust Your Set · Double Take · The Edge · End of Part One · The Ernie Kovacs Show · Exit 57 · The Fast Show · The Flip Wilson Show · French and Saunders · Fridays · Full Frontal · Goodness Gracious Me · The Goon Show · Hale and Pace · Hall’s Pictorial Weekly · Harry Enfield and Chums · (Ruddy Hell! It’s) Harry & Paul · Haywire · Hee Haw · Human Giant · The Idiot Box · The Imaginatively Titled Punt & Dennis Show · Important Things with Demetri Martin · The Impressions Show with Culshaw and Stephenson · In Living Color · The Jackie Gleason Show · Jam · The Jamie Kennedy Experiment · Just Say Julie · KaBlam! · The Karen Dunbar Show · The Kevin Bishop Show · The Kids in the Hall · Laugh-In · Laura Solon: Talking and Not Talking · Limmy’s Show · Little Britain · MADtv · The Mary Whitehouse Experience · Michael & Michael Have Issues  · The Milton Berle Show · That Mitchell and Webb Look/That Mitchell and Webb Sound · The Mitchell and Webb Situation · Monty Python’s Flying Circus · Naked Camera · Naked Video · Mr. Show · Newman and Baddiel in Pieces · Newsjack · The Newz · Not the Nine O’clock News · The Omid Djalili Show · Paul Merton: The Series · Q · The Red Skelton Show · The Rerun Show · The Richard Pryor Show · Robot Chicken · Ronni Ancona & Co · The Ronnie Johns Half Hour · Roundhouse · Royal Canadian Air Farce · Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In · Rush Hour · Saturday Night Live · Second City Television · A Series of Psychotic Episodes · The Sketch Show · Smack the Pony · The Smothers Brothers Show · The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour · Sonny With a Chance · Spoons · The State · Texaco Star Theater · That Was The Week That Was · Tilt · Tim and Eric Awesome Show, Great Job! · Tracey Takes On… · The Tracey Ullman Show · Turkey Television · Turn On · The Two Ronnies · Upright Citizens Brigade · The Vacant Lot · Victoria Wood As Seen On TV · Victoria Wood’s Mid Life Christmas · Week Ending · The Whitest Kids U’ Know · Whose Line Is It Anyway? · You Can’t Do That on Television · Your Show of Shows

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